U.S. aviation system showing signs of strain from shutdown as screeners, inspectors stay home

New Delhi, January 13, 2019:  The partial government shutdown is starting to strain America’s aviation system, with unpaid security screeners staying home, air-traffic controllers suing the government and safety inspectors off the job.

Miami International Airport is providing the most visible evidence yet that the shutdown is at least making air travel less convenient.

Facing double the usual number of absences among unpaid TSA screeners, the airport was to close one of its terminals for most of Saturday, Sunday and Monday to make sure TSA can adequately staff the remaining security checkpoints.

Meanwhile, the national union representing air traffic controllers — who are also working without pay during the shutdown, entering its 22nd day Saturday — sued the government, claiming they are illegally being denied pay.

And aviation-safety inspectors are still off the job, deemed not to be essential enough to keep working during the shutdown.

The Transportation Security Administration said that 5.1 percent of screeners were absent on Thursday, up from 3.3 percent on the same date last year. The TSA has 51,000 transportation security officers, who have continued to work because they are deemed essential employees.

Screeners represent just 6 percent of government workers who didn’t get paychecks Friday because of the shutdown. Industry officials worry that they are particularly likely to stop showing up because their relatively low pay means they could quickly struggle to pay bills without money coming in.

The agency has very few tools to deal with a severe shortage. It has a team of nonessential employees who are trained to screen air travelers, but that is only a stopgap designed to cover for shortages at one or two airports during a natural disaster.

January is a relatively light travel period, but industry officials worry what will happen if the shutdown lingers and more TSA employees leave for jobs that include a paycheck.

Miami International, the nation’s 25th-busiest airport, with six terminals, planned to close off Concourse G at 1 p.m. for the next three days and shift a dozen flights a day to other terminals.

Other major airports said they had no immediate plans to close terminals or take other drastic measures.

About 10,000 air traffic controllers under the Federal Aviation Administration continued to work without pay. On Friday, their union, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, filed a lawsuit in federal court in Washington and asked for an order that its members get paid according to japantimes.co.jp.

Union President Paul Rinaldi said there is already a shortage of controllers, and if current controllers decide to retire — about 1,900 are eligible — the government could be forced to restrict air traffic, creating flight delays.

About 3,300 aviation safety inspectors under the FAA were not working — since 2013, they have not been considered essential employees who must stay on the job during government shutdowns. They oversee and certify inspections done by employees of airlines and aircraft-repair shops.

An FAA spokesman said earlier in the week that the agency was recalling inspectors and focusing resources on overseeing airline operations. He declined to say how many inspectors are working, but union officials believed it was about 100.

“A hundred out of 3,300 is probably not real good odds,” said Stephen Carl, an FAA inspector in Florida. “Please put us back on the job right now. Aviation is not being overseen.” Carl said ongoing investigations have been put on hold by the shutdown.

Jeffrey Price, an aviation-security consultant and a professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver, expected that more TSA agents would fail to show up, creating longer lines and creating a potential target for terrorists at airports.

“As the lines slow down and the crowds grow larger, it puts more and more passengers at risk from an attack,” Price said. He added, “The screeners who do come to work will be forced to make up the slack, which erodes their effectiveness even more.”

TSA officials said screeners weren’t getting lax about their work. “Security standards have NOT and will NOT be compromised,” tweeted TSA spokesman Michael Bilello.

Longer lines would alienate travelers and could push more airports to replace government employees with privately contracted screening agents. Airports in San Francisco and Kansas City already do that, with approval from the Transportation Department.

In 2016 — when TSA was understaffed at many airports, creating lines long enough to make many travelers miss their flights — other airports explored hiring contractors. Most dropped the idea after TSA’s performance improved.

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